Hepatitis B Vaccine Injury Claims: What You Need to Know

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend vaccination against hepatitis B for children beginning at birth and for adults who have certain risk factors. Children should receive three doses of the hepatitis B vaccine before reaching nineteen months, and adults who need the vaccine should receive either two or three doses depending on the specific vaccine administered. Like all vaccines, the CDC considers hepatitis B vaccines to be safe for most people. But, some parents and vaccine recipients will need to hire a vaccine injury lawyer to help them recover just compensation. Continue reading

Tetanus Vaccine Injury Claims Under the VICP

Tetanus is among the many diseases for which the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend routine vaccination. Like all CDC-recommended vaccines, the tetanus vaccines (including DTaP, DTP, DT, Td and TT) are generally considered safe, but they present risks for certain injuries and illnesses in a very small percentage of cases. In this article, vaccine lawyer Leah Durant explains the process of seeking compensation for tetanus vaccine injuries under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP). Continue reading

Didn’t Get Vaccinated During the 2020-2021 Flu Season? The CDC Still Recommends Getting a Flu Shot

As flu season draws to a close, many people are realizing that they never got around to getting their annual flu shot. With everything going at the end of 2020 and the start of 2021, this is understandable. Despite low vaccination rates, the 2020-2021 flu season was one of the least-impactful on record (due in large part to social distancing and mask-wearing to prevent the spread of COVID-19), and the low number of flu-related deaths is being viewed as one of the few silver linings of the pandemic. Continue reading

What are the Symptoms of Flu Shot Injuries?

It’s flu season; and, while the COVID-19 vaccine has taken center stage, it is important not to forget that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend that most people get a flu shot each year. When getting immunized against influenza, it is important to be aware of the symptoms of flu shot injuries, as vaccine injury lawyer Leah V. Durant explains below: Continue reading

Common Misconceptions about Vaccine Illnesses and Injuries

For individuals who have been diagnosed with vaccine-related illnesses and injuries, finding reliable information can be a challenge. Can a vaccine really make you sick? If so, what are the potential long-term complications? Are you entitled to financial compensation? If so, how do you collect the compensation you deserve? Here, vaccine lawyer Leah V. Durant explains what you need to know: Continue reading

CDC Publishes Updated Guide for Parents: “Your Child’s First Vaccines”

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently published an updated version of its guide for parents titled, Your Child’s First Vaccines: What You Need to Know. In addition to being posted on the CDC’s website, the guide is also available in .PDF format, and the CDC encourages doctors to provide parents with a copy of the guide when they bring their children in for their first immunizations. Continue reading

Vaccination Information for Women Who are Pregnant

During pregnancy, vaccinations can provide protection against certain diseases for both the mother and the child. As the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) explains, “Pregnant women share everything with their babies. That means when a pregnant woman gets vaccines, she isn’t just protecting [herself]— she is giving the baby some early protection too.”

While the CDC provides general vaccine recommendations for adults, it provides certain specific recommendations for women who are pregnant. If you are expecting a child, it will be important for you to speak with your doctor about getting vaccinated during your pregnancy. Continue reading

What Should I Do if My Child is Complaining of Shoulder Pain After Getting a Flu Shot?

Shoulder pain is among the most-common complaints following vaccinations among both children and adults. In general, vaccine injections are expected to cause a moderate amount of shoulder pain, with this pain subsiding within 24 to 48 hours.

However, if shoulder pain following a vaccination persists, or if the pain is more than a mild throb at the injection site, it could potentially be symptomatic of a vaccine-related injury. These injuries, known as shoulder injuries related to vaccine administration (SIRVA), are among the most-common complications from vaccine injections, and they are a risk for vaccine recipients of all ages. Continue reading

When Should Pain Go Away After a Flu Shot?

Getting the annual flu shot provides important protection for you and those around you. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that, “[a] flu vaccine is the first and best way to reduce your chances of getting the flu and spreading it to others,” and it recommends that almost everyone six months of age and older get vaccinated against influenza each year.

The annual flu shot has a handful of potential side effects, but the CDC describes these side effects as “generally mild.” These side effects include, “[s]oreness, redness and/or swelling from the shot.” Continue reading

FAQs: Shoulder Pain and Vaccine Injury Compensation

Shoulder injury related to vaccine administration (SIRVA) is among the most common of all vaccine-related injuries and illnesses. This is due predominantly to the fact that they are caused by vaccination errors rather than vaccine ingredients, which means that all vaccines that are administered via injection into the shoulder have the potential to cause SIRVA. Here are answers to some frequently-asked questions about recovering financial compensation for SIRVA under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP): Continue reading