Seeking Compensation for a Loved One’s Death from a Vaccine-Related Injury or Illness

Each year, an extremely small percentage of vaccine recipients in the United States suffer fatal complications. Anaphylaxis and Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) are among the most common causes of vaccine-related deaths in the U.S., though various other complications can have fatal effects as well. Regardless of the cause, for families that are coping with the loss of a loved one following a vaccination, recovering financial compensation typically involves hiring a vaccine lawyer to file a claim under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP). Continue reading

Hepatitis B Vaccine Injury Claims: What You Need to Know

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend vaccination against hepatitis B for children beginning at birth and for adults who have certain risk factors. Children should receive three doses of the hepatitis B vaccine before reaching nineteen months, and adults who need the vaccine should receive either two or three doses depending on the specific vaccine administered. Like all vaccines, the CDC considers hepatitis B vaccines to be safe for most people. But, some parents and vaccine recipients will need to hire a vaccine injury lawyer to help them recover just compensation. Continue reading

Tetanus Vaccine Injury Claims Under the VICP

Tetanus is among the many diseases for which the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend routine vaccination. Like all CDC-recommended vaccines, the tetanus vaccines (including DTaP, DTP, DT, Td and TT) are generally considered safe, but they present risks for certain injuries and illnesses in a very small percentage of cases. In this article, vaccine lawyer Leah Durant explains the process of seeking compensation for tetanus vaccine injuries under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP). Continue reading

Didn’t Get Vaccinated During the 2020-2021 Flu Season? The CDC Still Recommends Getting a Flu Shot

As flu season draws to a close, many people are realizing that they never got around to getting their annual flu shot. With everything going at the end of 2020 and the start of 2021, this is understandable. Despite low vaccination rates, the 2020-2021 flu season was one of the least-impactful on record (due in large part to social distancing and mask-wearing to prevent the spread of COVID-19), and the low number of flu-related deaths is being viewed as one of the few silver linings of the pandemic. Continue reading

Is It True that I Shouldn’t Get a Flu Shot if I have an Egg Allergy?

In prior years, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have advised that individuals who have egg allergies should consult with their physicians prior to getting the flu shot. This is because certain formulations of the flu shot are manufactured with egg proteins, and exposure to these proteins  has the potential to cause a hypersensitivity reaction among individuals with egg allergies.

In 2018, however, the CDC altered its recommendations regarding the flu shot and individuals who have minor egg allergies. Now, according to the CDC: Continue reading

CDC Publishes Updated Guide for Parents: “Your Child’s First Vaccines”

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently published an updated version of its guide for parents titled, Your Child’s First Vaccines: What You Need to Know. In addition to being posted on the CDC’s website, the guide is also available in .PDF format, and the CDC encourages doctors to provide parents with a copy of the guide when they bring their children in for their first immunizations. Continue reading

When is Pain More than Just a Side Effect of a Vaccination?

“Any vaccine can cause side effects.” While all vaccines recommended for use in the U.S. are considered safe for the vast majority of the population (with exceptions for individuals with certain medical conditions), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) wants vaccine recipients to be aware that certain side effects are possible.

However, the CDC also warns that, “[a]s with any medicine, there is a very remote chance of a vaccine causing a severe allergic reaction, other serious injury, or death.” Over the past five years, an average of roughly 1,000 people have filed petitions under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP). So, while pain may simply be a side effect of a vaccination, it could also be a sign of a potentially-serious injury, and vaccine recipients should have an understanding of when they may need medical attention and when they may be entitled to compensation under the VICP. Continue reading

FDA Approves Expanded Use of Gardasil 9 HPV Vaccine

In late 2018, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced expanded approval of the Gardasil 9 human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine. Previously approved for administration to males and females between the ages of 9 and 26, Gardasil 9 is now an approved HPV vaccine for men and women through 45 years of age.

According to the FDA’s press release:

“[The] approval represents an important opportunity to help prevent HPV-related diseases and cancers in a broader age range. . . . The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has stated that HPV vaccination prior to becoming infected with the HPV types covered by the vaccine has the potential to prevent more than 90 percent of these cancers, or 31,200 cases every year, from ever developing.”

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What Should You Ask and Tell your Doctor Before You Get Vaccinated?

While vaccinations are routine procedures that carry strong recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), they still carry certain risks. Flu shots, tetanus shots, and other CDC-recommended vaccinations are known to cause a variety of injuries and illnesses, and errors during the vaccine administration process can lead to various types of painful and debilitating shoulder injuries. Continue reading

Who Should Not Get Vaccinated? Recommendations from the CDC

who-should-be-vaccinatedAlthough the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends vaccination as the best way to prevent the spread of the flu and other diseases, it also says that certain people should not get vaccinated. Since not getting vaccinated carries obvious risks, anyone who has questions about whether it is safe to receive a particular vaccination should consult their doctor.

The CDC provides specific recommendations for each approved vaccine with regard to the health risks that may outweigh the benefits of vaccination. Generally speaking, however, the types of factors that may lead your doctor to recommend against getting vaccinated include the following. Continue reading