Immunization Works is the CDC’s Monthly Vaccine Newsletter

Each month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) publish a newsletter highlighting recent news and updates in the world of immunizations. The CDC provides this newsletter, titled Immunization Works, to “national health care provider and consumer groups for distribution to their members and constituencies.” However, it is also free to the public online. Continue reading

Who Should Not Get Vaccinated? Recommendations from the CDC

who-should-be-vaccinatedAlthough the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends vaccination as the best way to prevent the spread of the flu and other diseases, it also says that certain people should not get vaccinated. Since not getting vaccinated carries obvious risks, anyone who has questions about whether it is safe to receive a particular vaccination should consult their doctor.

The CDC provides specific recommendations for each approved vaccine with regard to the health risks that may outweigh the benefits of vaccination. Generally speaking, however, the types of factors that may lead your doctor to recommend against getting vaccinated include the following. Continue reading

Have You or Someone You Love Experienced Pain or Illness Following Vaccination? Get Valuable Information on How to Seek Help

Experiencing pain or an illness following vaccination can be frightening. Whether it’s you or a family member, knowing what to do – and where to turn for help – can be a challenge.

At the Law Offices of Leah V. Durant, PLLC, we represent clients who have suffered a vaccine-related illness or injury nationwide. We have also developed numerous resources for individuals who have been harmed by vaccines. The following are 10 of our most popular articles on vaccine-related injuries and how to go about filing a claim for compensation under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP). Continue reading

Will the Use of “Ouchless” Measles Vaccines Reduce the Risk of Vaccine Shoulder Injury?

woman-shldr-painIn the United States, measles has largely been eradicated thanks to the introduction of the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine in 1971. The MMR vaccine is typically administered in a series of two doses; and, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), these two doses are 97 percent effective in preventing contraction of this potentially-fatal disease. Each year, less than 1,000 people in the United States contract measles, and in some years the number of reported cases is less than 100.

Unfortunately, like all vaccines, the measles vaccines (including MMR) are not without their own risks. Continue reading